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Holiday Crafts

Join us on Saturday, December 3rd, at 11 am and get crafty and creative!  Make a sparkly CD ornament  – or a miniature wreath ornament.

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Holiday Crafts

Saturday, December 3 at 11 am

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You’ll always find great stories and songs in Miss Alexia’s Story Garden!  And her magic ukulele, too!  This program is designed for babies and children up to 4 years old.   No need to sign up, just come on in to The Field Library!

Story Garden with Miss Alexia

Friday, December 2, 9 & 16 at 11 am

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Artist Jessica Dubin began our third session of “Tiles of the Wild” with a demonstration of the many tools that are used to create texture.  img_8369

Who knew that popsicle sticks were just perfect for making scales?!  Everyone got to work adding texture to their Hudson Valley animals – and then finished up their backgrounds.

And now the tiles are ready to be fired.  Wow!  Don’t they look incredible?!img_8427

This program is made possible in part with funds from Westchester Library System’s Mini-Grant Initiative supported by Entergy and Con Edison. 

Tiles of the Wild!

Nineteen children are participating in a four-week STEM workshop here at The Field Library. “Tiles of the Wild!” is being led by artist Jessica Dubin. 

During the first session, participants learned the science of clay, and about animals native to the Hudson Valley region. They each selected an animal to portray on a clay tile, and did research using books and online resources. They worked together to select a shape for the tiles that will be part of a mural. Their choice? Hexagons (sorry square and triangle!).  Kids made drawings of their animal and included details and textures that can be used when they work the design into clay.

During the second session, participants cut slabs of clay into hexagonal tiles using pin tools and fettling knives. They smoothed edges and began to create their animal in relief. A relief design is raised above the base surface of the tile. They used their drawings as a guide and “pounced” the big shapes on to extra clay using a pin tool. Cut pieces were attached to the base using a method called slipping and scoring. The tiles were covered with plastic and set aside for the next session.

To see more pictures from our Tiles of the Wild program, CLICK HERE.

This program is made possible in part with funds from Westchester Library System’s Mini-Grant Initiative supported by Entergy and Con Edison. 

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